Posts Tagged ‘lucidworks’

More than an API – the real third wave of search technology

I recently read a blog post by Karl Hampson of Realise Okana (who offer HP Autonomy and SRCH2 as closed source search options) on his view of the ‘third wave’ of search. The second wave he identifies (correctly) as open source, admitting somewhat grudgingly that “We’d heard about Lucene for years but no customers seemed to take it seriously until all of a sudden they did”. However, he also suggests that there is a third wave on its way – and this is led by HP with its IDOL OnDemand offering.

I’m afraid to say I think that IDOL OnDemand is in fact neither innovative or market leading – it’s simply an API to a cloud hosted search engine and some associated services. Amazon Cloudsearch (originally backed by Amazon’s own A9 search engine, but more recently based on Apache Solr) offers a very similar thing, as do many other companies including Found.no and Qbox with an Elasticsearch backend. For those with relatively simple search requirements and no issues with hosting their data with a third party, these services can be great value. It is however interesting to see the transition of Autonomy’s offering from a hugely expensive license fee (plus support) model to an on-demand cloud service: the HP acquisition and the subsequent legal troubles have certainly shaken things up! At a recent conference I heard a HP representative even suggest that IDOL OnDemand is ‘free software’ which sounds like a slightly desperate attempt to jump on the open source bandwagon and attract some hacker interest without actually giving anything away.

So if a third wave of search technology does exist, what might it actually be? One might suggest that companies such as Attivio or our partners Lucidworks, with their integrated solutions built on proven and scalable open source cores and folding in Hadoop and other Big Data stacks, are surfing pretty high at present. Others such as Elasticsearch (the company) are offering advanced analytical capabilities and easy scalability. We hear about indexes of billions of items, thousands of separate indexes : the scale of some of these systems is incredible and only economically possible where license fees aren’t a factor. Across our own clients we’re seeing searches across huge collections of complex biological data and monitoring systems handling a million new stories a day. Perhaps the third wave of search hasn’t yet arrived – we’re just seeing the second wave continue to flood in.

One interesting potential third wave is the use of search technology to handle even higher volumes of data (which we’re going to receive from the Internet of Things apparently) – classifying, categorising and tagging streams of machine-generated data. Companies such as Twitter and LinkedIn are already moving towards these new models – Unified Log Processing is a commonly used term. Take a look at a recent experiment in connecting our own Luwak stored query library to Apache Samza, developed at LinkedIn for stream processing applications.

Autumn events roundup – ESS DC, Solr vs Elasticsearch & a new Meetup

It’s looking like a busy Autumn for search events – first, I’m presenting at Enterprise Search & Discovery 2014 in Washington DC on November 5th, talking about ‘Turning Search Upside Down with open source software’. I’ll be describing how we’ve replaced various underperforming, big name closed source search engines with faster & more scalable open source technology, including our own Luwak stored query engine. Do let me know if you’re in DC, I’d be very happy to meet up. The week after this is Lucene Revolution, which sadly we won’t be attending this year, but it is recommended if you’re interested in Lucene and Solr.

Towards the end of November there’s Search Solutions, a great day of presentations about all aspects of search held at the British Computer Society in Covent Garden. This year Tom Mortimer from Flax will be presenting some research we’ve done into performance comparisons between Lucene/Solr and Elasticsearch, and there are also presentations from Thomson Reuters, the British Library, Microsoft, Yahoo! and Google. I highly recommend this event, it’s always worth attending.

We’re also starting a new Meetup in London, a group for users of Apache Lucene/Solr (there’s an Elasticsearch London user group but strangely no equivalent for the other popular stack). Our first event is on November 28th, kindly hosted by Bloomberg (who are no strangers to Lucene/Solr themselves) and featuring Shalin Mangar, a Lucene/Solr committer from Lucidworks who is visiting Europe that week. We’re hoping that we can run these events every few months, but we need help from the community, so if you could talk, sponsor or host the Meetups do let us know.

In December we’ll be holding another Cambridge Search Meetup and will be talking about our work with the European Bioinformatics Institute on the BioSolr project – the date to be confirmed. Busy times!

As Hadoop gains, does Lucene benefit?

The last few weeks have seen a rush of investment in companies that offer Hadoop-powered Big Data platforms – the most recent being Intel’s investment in Cloudera, but Hortonworks has also snorted up $100m.

Gartner correctly explains that Hadoop isn’t just one project, but an ecosystem comprising an increasing number of open source projects (and some closed source distributions and add-ons). Once you’ve got your Big Data in a HDFS-shaped pile, there are many ways to make sense of it – and one of those is a search engine, so there’s been a lot of work recently trying to add Lucene-powered search engines such as Apache Solr and Elasticsearch into the mix. There’s also been some interesting partnerships.

I’m thus wondering whether this could signal a significant boost to the development of these search projects: there are already Lucene/Solr committers working at Hadoop-flavoured companies who have been working on distributed search and other improvements to scalability. Let’s hope some of the investment cash goes to search!

The closed-source topping on the open-source Elasticsearch

Today Elasticsearch (the company, not the software) announced their first commercial, closed-source product, a monitoring plugin for Elasticsearch (the software, not the company – yes I know this is confusing, one might suspect deliberately so). Amongst the raft of press releases there are a few small liberties with the truth, for example describing Elasticsearch (the company) as ‘founded in 2012 by the people behind the Elasticsearch and Apache Lucene open source projects’ – surely the latter project was started by Doug Cutting, who isn’t part of the aforementioned company.

Adding some closed-source dusting to a popular open-source distribution is nothing new of course – many companies do it, especially those that are venture funded – it’s a way of building intellectual property while also taking full advantage of the open-source model in terms of user adoption. Other strategies include curated distributions such as that offered by Heliosearch, founded by Solr creator Yonik Seeley and our partner LucidWorks‘ complete packaged search applications. It can help lock potential clients into your version of the software and your vision of the future, although of course they are still free to download the core and go it alone (or engage people like us to help do so), which helps them retain some control.

It’s going to be interesting to see how this strategy develops for Elasticsearch (for the last time, the company). At Flax we’ve also built various additional software components for search applications – but as we have no external investors to please these are freely available as open-source software, including Luwak our fast stored query engine, Clade a taxonomy/classification prototype and even some file format extractors.

Time for the crystal ball again…

It’s always fun to make predictions about the future, especially as one can be pretty sure to be proved wrong in interesting ways. At the start of 2014 we at Flax are looking forward to another year of building open source search and we already have some great client projects in progress that we’ll shortly be able to talk about, but what else might be happening this year? Here’s some points to note:

  • The Elasticsearch project continues to add features at a prodigious rate during the arms race between it and Apache Solr – this battle can only be good news for end users in our view. We can expect a 1.0 release of Elasticsearch this year and several further major 4.x releases of Solr.
  • The Solr world has become slightly more complex as original author Yonik Seeley has left Lucidworks to start his own company, Heliosearch – with its own packaged distribution of Solr. How will Heliosearch contribute to the Solr ecosystem?
  • HP Autonomy is a sponsor of the Enterprise Search Europe conference this year, although there’s still some fallout from HP’s acquisition of Autonomy, and little news from the various official investigations into this process. Perhaps this year HP’s overall strategy will become a little clearer.
  • The Big Data bandwagon rolls on and more or less every search company now stresses its capabilities in this area for marketing purposes: but how big is Big? It’s not enough just to re-quote IDC’s latest study on how many exobytes everyone is producing these days, the value is in the detail, not the sheer volume: good (and deep) analytics is the key.
  • We think there might be some interesting things happening around open source search and bioinformatics soon – watch this space!

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Posted in News

January 7th, 2014

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Lucene Revolution 2013, Dublin: day 1

Four of the Flax team are in Dublin this week for Lucene Revolution, almost certainly the largest event centred on open source search and specifically Lucene. There are probably a couple of hundred Lucene enthusiasts here and the event is being held at the Aviva Stadium on Landsdowne Road: look out the windows and you can see the pitch! Here are some personal reflections: a number of the talks I attended today have a connection to our own work in media monitoring which we’re talking about tomorrow.

Doug Turnbull’s Test Driven Relevancy was interesting, discussing OSC’s Quepid tool that allows content owners and search experts to work together to tweak and tune Solr’s options to present the right results for a query. I wondered whether this tool might eventually be used to develop a Learning to Rank option for Solr, as Lucene 4 now supports a pluggable scoring model.

I enjoyed Real-Time Inverted Search in the Cloud Using Lucene and Storm during which Joshua Conlin told us about running hundreds of thousands of stored queries in a distrubuted architecture. Storm in particular sounds worth investigating further. There is currently no attempt to reduce or ‘prune’ the set of queries before applying them: Joshua quoted speeds of 4000 queries/sec across their cluster of 8 instances: impressive numbers, but our own monitoring applications are working at 20 times that speed by working out which queries not to apply.

I broke out at this point to catch up with some contacts, including the redoubtable Iain Fletcher of Search Technologies – always a pleasure. After a sandwich lunch I went along to hear Andrzej Bialecki of Lucidworks talk about Sidecar Indexes, a method for allowing rapid updates to Lucene fields. This reminded me of our own experiments in this area using Lucene’s pluggable codecs.

Next was more from the Opensource Connections team, as John Berryman talked about their work to update a patent search application that uses a very old search syntax, BRS. This sounds very much the work we’ve done to translate one search engine syntax into another for various media monitoring companies – so far we can handle dtSearch and we’re currently finishing off support for HP/Autonomy Verity’s VQL (PDF).

This latter issue has got me thinking that perhaps it might be possible to collaboratively develop an open source search engine query language – various parsers could be developed to turn other search syntaxes into this language, and search engines like Lucene (or anything else) could then be extended to implement support for it. This would potentially allow much easier migration between search engine technologies. I’m discussing the concept with various folks at the event this week so do please get in touch if you are interested!

Back tomorrow with a further update on this exciting conference – tonight we’re all off to the Temple Bar area of Dublin for food and drink, generously provided by Lucidworks who should also be thanked for organising the Revolution.

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Posted in Technical, events

November 6th, 2013

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Finding the elephant in the room: open source search & Hadoop grow closer together

I’ve been lucky enough to attend two talks on Hadoop in the last few weeks which has made me take a closer look at this technology. In case you didn’t know, Hadoop is an Apache top level open source project comprising a framework for distributed computing and storage, originally created by Doug Cutting (also the creator of Apache Lucene) while at Yahoo! in 2005. Distributed computing is carried out using MapReduce (roughly speaking, the ‘map’ bit involves splitting a processing task up into chunks and distributing these among various processing nodes, the ‘reduce’ bit brings all the results together again) and the storage uses the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). There are other parts of Hadoop including a database (HBase), data warehouse with SQL-like language (Hive), scripting language (Pig) and more.

Those I’ve spoken to who have attempted to build applications on Hadoop have said that it’s very much a kit of parts rather than an integrated platform, so not that easy to get started with – which has led to the emergence of various vendors providing ‘curated’ distributions and support, much as Lucidworks does for Apache Lucene/Solr. Cloudera, Hortonworks, and MapR are just some of the best-known of these vendors. With everyone jumping on the BigData bandwagon these days some of these vendors have attracted significant interest and funding.

As you might expect full-text search is often required for these distributed systems and there have been various attempts to bring Hadoop and search closer together. Hortonworks support integration with Elasticsearch, although this currently appears to mean that you can use Hive or Pig to move data from Hadoop on or off a separate Elasticsearch cluster, rather than the search engine running on the cluster itself. Cloudera’s integration of Hadoop with Solr appears to be tighter, with Solr storing its indexes on HDFS directly (perhaps not surprising considering Lucene/Solr committer Mark Miller, who is responsible for most recent SolrCloud development, works for Cloudera). Cloudera even has its own data conditioning framework Flume (yes, it seems we need yet another data conditioning/pipelining solution!) and allows for distributed indexing. MapR have partnered with LucidWorks and integrated LucidWorks Search into their distribution. All these vendors are heavy contributors to Hadoop of course and most also contribute to Lucene/Solr or Elasticsearch.

Since Hadoop has been linked with search from the beginning one can hope that these integration efforts will continue – applications that require distributed search are becoming increasingly common and Hadoop, despite its nature as a kit of parts requiring assembly, is a good foundation to build on.

Meetups, genomes and hack days: Grant Ingersoll visits the UK

Lucene/Solr commiter, Mahout co-creator, LucidWorks co-founder and general all-round search expert Grant Ingersoll visited us last week on his way to the SIGIR conference in Dublin. We visited the European Bioinformatics Institute on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus to hear about some fascinating projects using Lucene/Solr to index genomes, phenomes and proteins and for Grant to give a talk on recent developments in both Lucene/Solr and Mahout – it was gratifying that over 50 people turned up to listen and at least 30 of these indicated they were using the technology.

After a brief rest it was then time to travel to London so Grant could talk at the Enterprise Search London Meetup on both recent developments in Lucene/Solr and what he dubbed ‘Search engine (ab)use’ – some crazy use cases of Lucene/Solr including for very fast key/value storage. Some great statistics including how Twitter make new tweets searchable in around 50 microseconds using only 8-10 indexing servers.

Next it was back to Cambridge for our own Lucene/Solr hack day in a great new co-working space. Attendees ranged from those who had never used Lucene/Solr to those with significant search expertise, and some had come from as far away as Germany – after a brief introduction we split into several groups each mentored by a member of the Flax team. Two groups (one comprised entirely of those who had never used Lucene) worked on a dataset of tweets from UK members of parliament and a healthy sense of competition developed between them – you can see some of the code they developed at in our Github account including an entity extractor webservice. Another group, led by Grant, created a SolrCloud cluster, with around 1-2 million documents split into 2 shards – running on ten laptops over a wireless connection! Impressively this was set up in less than ten minutes. Others worked on their own applications including an index of proteins and there was even some work on the Lucene/Solr code itself.

We’re hoping to put the results of some of these projects live very soon, so you can see just what can be built in a single day using this powerful open source software. Thanks to all who came, our hosts at Cambridge Business Lounge and of course Grant for his considerable energy and invaluable expertise. If nothing else, we’ve introduced a lot more people to open source search and sparked some ideas, and we ended off the week with beer in a sunny pub garden which is always nice!

Search events for 2013

Here’s a quick roundup of search-related events coming soon:

Next week Lucene/Solr Revolution is to be held in San Diego, with a couple of days of training on April 29th & 30th and the main event on the 1st and 2nd May. This is probably the biggest event dedicated to Apache Lucene/Solr and features a huge array of presentations from Etsy, Wells Fargo, Lucidworks and even Microsoft who are increasingly supporting open source technologies.

Enterprise Search Europe is next on 15th and 16th May with a day of workshops on the 14th, including one from the Flax team. I’m looking forward to the various open source panels and presentations of course, and hearing from people from Ernst & Young, Neilsen Norman Group, Oracle and the University of Manchester. We’re also running a Meetup event on the first evening, open to all, with the usual informal mix of beer, snacks and search!

Some of the Flax team are hoping to attend Berlin Buzzwords on June 3rd & 4th – this conference promises to address “search”, “store” and “scale” – certainly sounds interesting! We know there will be lots of talks on elasticsearch and Lucene/Solr.

There’s more to come in the Autumn of course – more details when we know them. Hope to meet you at one of these great events!

Strange bedfellows? The rise of cloud based search

Last night our US partners Lucid Imagination announced that LucidWorks, their packaged and supported version of Apache Lucene/Solr, is available on Microsoft’s Azure cloud computing service. It seems like only a few weeks since Amazon announced their own CloudSearch system and no doubt other ’search as a service’ providers are waiting in the wings (we’re going to need a new acronym as SaaS is already taken!). At first the combination of a search platform based on open source Java code with Microsoft hosting might seem strange, and it raises some interesting questions about the future of Microsoft’s own FAST Search technology – is this final proof that FAST will only ever be part of Sharepoint and never a standalone product? However with search technology becoming more and more of a commodity this is a great option for customers looking for search over relatively small numbers of documents.

Lucid’s offering is considerably more flexible and full-featured than Amazon’s, which we hear is pretty basic with a lack of standard search features like contextual snippets and a number of bugs in the client software. You can see the latter in action at Runar Buvik’s excellent OpenTestSearch website. With prices for the Lucid service ranging from free for small indexes, this is certainly an option worth considering.