Posts Tagged ‘big data’

Innovations in Knowledge Organisation, Singapore: a review

I’m just back from Singapore: my first visit to this amazing, dynamic and everchanging city-state, at the kind invitation of Patrick Lambe, to speak at the first Innovations in Knowledge Organisation conference. I think this was probably one of the best organised and most interesting events I’ve attended in the last few years.

The event started with an enthusiastic keynote from Patrick, introducing the topics we’d discuss over the next two days: knowledge management, taxonomies, linked data and search, a wide range of interlinked and interdependent themes. Next was a series of quick-fire PechaKucha sessions – 20 slides, 20 seconds each – a great way to introduce the audience to the topics under discussion, although slightly terrifying to deliver! I spoke on open source search, covering Elasticsearch & Solr and how to start a project using them, and somehow managed to draw breath occasionally. I think my fellow presenters also found it somewhat challenging although nobody lost the pace completely! Next was a quick, interactive panel discussion (roving mics rather than a row of seats) that set the scene for how the event would work – reactive, informal and exciting, rather than the traditional series of audience-facing Powerpoint presentations which don’t necessarily combine well with jetlag.

After lunch, showcasing Singapore’s multicultural heritage (I don’t think I’ve ever had pasta with Chinese peppered beef before, but I hope to again) we moved on to the first set of case studies. Each presenter had 6 minutes to sell their case study (my own was about how we helped Reed Specialist Recruitment build an open source search platform) and then attendees could choose which tables to join to discuss the cases further, for three 20-minute sessions. I had some great discussions including hearing about how a local government employment agency has used Solr. We then moved on to a ‘knowledge cafe’, with tables again divided up by topics chosen by the audience – so this really was a conference about what attendees wanted to discuss, not just what the presenters thought was important.

I was scheduled to deliver the keynote the next day, having been asked to speak on ‘The Future of Search’ – I chose to introduce some topics around Big Data and Streaming Analytics, and how search software might be used to analyze the huge volumes of data we might expect from the Internet of Things. I had some great feedback from the audience (although I’m pretty sure I inspired and confused them in equal measure) – perhaps Singapore was the right place to deliver this talk, as the government are planning to make it the world’s first ‘smart nation‘ – handling data will absolutely key to making this possible.

More case study pitches followed, and since I wasn’t delivering one myself this time I had a chance to listen to some of the studies. I particularly enjoyed hearing from Kia Siang Hock about the National Library Board Singapore’s OneSearch service, which allowed a federated search across tens of millions of items from many different repositories (e.g. books, newspaper articles, audio transcripts). The technologies used included Veridian, Solr, Vocapia for speech transcription and Mahout for building a recommendation system. In particular, Solr was credited for saving ‘millions of Singapore dollars’ in license fees compared to the previous closed source search system it replaced. Also of interest was Straits Knowledge’s system for capturing the knowledge assets of an organisation with a system built on a graph database, and Haliza Jailani on using named entity recognition and Linked Data (again for the National Library Board Singapore).

We then moved into the final sessions of the day, ‘knowledge clinics’ – like the ‘knowledge cafes’ these were table-based, informal and free-form discussions around topics chosen by attendees. Matt Moore then gave the last session of the day with an amusing take on Building Competencies, dividing KM professionals into individuals, tribes and organisations. Patrick and Maish Nichani then closed the event with a brief summary.

Singapore is a long way to go for an event, but I’m very glad I did. The truly international mix of attendees, the range of subjects and the dynamic and focused way the conference was organised made for a very interesting and engaging two days: I also made some great contacts and had a chance to see some of this beautiful city. Congratulations to Patrick, Maish and Dave Clarke on a very successful inaugural event and I’m looking forward to hearing about the next one! Slides and videos are already appearing on the IKO blog.

Going international – open source search in London, Berlin & Singapore

We’re travelling a bit over the next few weeks to visit and speak at various events. This weekend Alan Woodward is at Berlin Buzzwords, a hacker-focused conference with a programme full of search talks. He’s not speaking this year, but if you want to talk about Lucene, Solr or our own Luwak stored search library and the crazy things you can do with it, do buy him a beer!

Next week we’re hosting another London Lucene/Solr User Group Meetup with Doug Turnbull of Open Source Connections. Doug is the author of a forthcoming book on Relevant Search and the creator of Quepid, a tool for gathering relevance judgements for Solr-based search systems and then seeing how these scores change as you tune the Solr installation. Tuning relevance is a very common (and often difficult) task during search projects and can make a significant difference to the user experience (and in particular, for e-commerce can hugely affect your bottom line) – so we’re very much looking forward to Doug’s talk.

The week after I’m in Singapore visiting the Innovations in Knowledge Organisation conference – a new event focusing on knowledge management and search. I’ve been asked to talk about open source search and to keynote the second day of the event and speak on ‘The Future of Search’. Do let me know if you’re attending and would like to meet up.

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Posted in events

May 29th, 2015

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Searching for opportunities in Real-Time Analytics

I spent a day last week at a new event from UNICOM, a conference on Real-Time Analytics. Mike Ferguson chaired the event and was kind enough to spend time with me over lunch exploring how search software might fit into the mix, something that has been on my mind since hearing about the Unified Log concept a few weeks ago.

Real-Time Analytics is a field where sometimes vast amounts of data in motion is gathered, filtered, cleaned and analysed to trigger various actions to benefit a business: building on earlier capabilities in Business Intelligence, the endgame is a business that adapts automatically to changing conditions in real-time – for example, automating the purchasing of extra stock based on changing behaviour of customers. The analysis part of this chain is driven by complex models, often based on sets of training data. Complex Event Processing or CEP is an older term for this kind of process (if you’re already suffering from buzzword overflow, Martin Kleppman has put some of these terms in context for those more familiar with web paradigms). Tools mentioned included Amazon Kinesis and from the Apache stable Cassandra, Hadoop, Kafka, Yarn, Storm and Spark. I particularly enjoyed Michael Cutler’s presentation on Tumra’s Spark-based system.

One of the central problems identified was due to the rapid growth of data (including from the fabled Internet of Things) it will shortly be impossible to store every data point produced – so we must somehow sort the wheat from the chaff. Options for the analysis part include SQL-like query languages and more complex machine learning algorithms. I found myself wondering if search technology, using a set of stored queries, could be used somehow to reduce the flow of this continuous stream of data, using something like this prototype implementation based on Apache Samza. One could use this approach to transform unstructured data (say, a stream of text-based customer comments) into more structured data for later timeline analysis, split streams of events into several parts for separate processing or just to watch for sets of particularly interesting and complex events. Although search platforms such as Elasticsearch are already being integrated into the various Real-Time Analytics frameworks, these seem to be being used for offline processing rather than acting directly on the stream itself.

One potential advantage is that it might be a lot easier for analysts to generate a stored search than to learn SQL or the complexities of machine learning – just spend some time with a collection of past events and refine your search terms, facets and filters until your results are useful, and save the query you have generated.

This was a very interesting introduction to a relatively new field and thanks to UNICOM for the invitation. We’re going to continue to explore the possibilities!

More than an API – the real third wave of search technology

I recently read a blog post by Karl Hampson of Realise Okana (who offer HP Autonomy and SRCH2 as closed source search options) on his view of the ‘third wave’ of search. The second wave he identifies (correctly) as open source, admitting somewhat grudgingly that “We’d heard about Lucene for years but no customers seemed to take it seriously until all of a sudden they did”. However, he also suggests that there is a third wave on its way – and this is led by HP with its IDOL OnDemand offering.

I’m afraid to say I think that IDOL OnDemand is in fact neither innovative or market leading – it’s simply an API to a cloud hosted search engine and some associated services. Amazon Cloudsearch (originally backed by Amazon’s own A9 search engine, but more recently based on Apache Solr) offers a very similar thing, as do many other companies including Found.no and Qbox with an Elasticsearch backend. For those with relatively simple search requirements and no issues with hosting their data with a third party, these services can be great value. It is however interesting to see the transition of Autonomy’s offering from a hugely expensive license fee (plus support) model to an on-demand cloud service: the HP acquisition and the subsequent legal troubles have certainly shaken things up! At a recent conference I heard a HP representative even suggest that IDOL OnDemand is ‘free software’ which sounds like a slightly desperate attempt to jump on the open source bandwagon and attract some hacker interest without actually giving anything away.

So if a third wave of search technology does exist, what might it actually be? One might suggest that companies such as Attivio or our partners Lucidworks, with their integrated solutions built on proven and scalable open source cores and folding in Hadoop and other Big Data stacks, are surfing pretty high at present. Others such as Elasticsearch (the company) are offering advanced analytical capabilities and easy scalability. We hear about indexes of billions of items, thousands of separate indexes : the scale of some of these systems is incredible and only economically possible where license fees aren’t a factor. Across our own clients we’re seeing searches across huge collections of complex biological data and monitoring systems handling a million new stories a day. Perhaps the third wave of search hasn’t yet arrived – we’re just seeing the second wave continue to flood in.

One interesting potential third wave is the use of search technology to handle even higher volumes of data (which we’re going to receive from the Internet of Things apparently) – classifying, categorising and tagging streams of machine-generated data. Companies such as Twitter and LinkedIn are already moving towards these new models – Unified Log Processing is a commonly used term. Take a look at a recent experiment in connecting our own Luwak stored query library to Apache Samza, developed at LinkedIn for stream processing applications.

London Elasticsearch User Group – September Meetup

Last night I joined a good-sized crowd at a venue on Hoxton Square for some talks on Elasticsearch – this Meetup group is very popular and always attracts a good proportion of people new to the world of search, as well as some familiar faces. I started with a quick announcement of our own Elasticsearch hackday in a few weeks time.

First of the speakers was Richard Pijnenburg with a surprisingly brief talk on Puppet and Elasticsearch – brief, because integrating the two is apparently very simple, requiring only a few lines of Puppet code. Some questions from the floor sparked a discussion of combining Puppet and Vagrant for setting up Elasticsearch instances: apparently very soon we’ll see a complete demo instance of Elasticsearch built using these technologies and including some example data, which will be very useful for those wanting to get started with the engine (here’s some more on this combination).

Next was Amit Talhan, ably assisted by Geza Kerekes, both from AlignAlytics who have been using Elasticsearch both as a data store, reporting store and more recently for analysing data from a survey of all the retail outlets in Nigeria. Generating a wealth of data across up to 1000 fields, including geolocation data harvested every five seconds, this survey could have been difficult if not impossible to handle using a traditional SQL database, but many of their colleagues were very used to SQL syntax and methods for analyzing data. Amit and Geza explained how they have used Elasticsearch and in particular aggregations to provide functionality such as checking for bad reporting by surveyors and unexpectedly high density areas (such as markets, where there may be 200 retail outlets in a few square metres). One challenge seems to have been how to explain to colleagues from the data analysis community that Elasticsearch can provide some, but not all of the functionality of a traditional database, but that alternative ways of indexing and querying data can be used to solve the same problems. Interestingly, performance testing by AlignAlytics proved that BigStep, a provider of ‘bare metal’ cloud hosting, could provide much better performance than their own dedicated servers.

Next was Mark Harwood with another of his fascinating investigations into how Elasticsearch can be used for analysis of user behaviour, showing how after a bad personal experience buying a new battery that turned out to be second-hand, he identified Amazon.com vendors with suspiciously positive reviews. He also discussed how behaviour-based term suggesters might be built using Elasticsearch’s significant_terms aggregration. His demonstration did remind me slightly of Xapian’s relevance feedback feature. I heard several people later say that they wished they had time for some of the fun projects Mark seems to work on!

The event finished with some lively discussion and some free pizza courtesy of Elasticsearch (the company). Thanks to Yann Cluchey as ever for organising the event and I look forward to seeing a few of the attendees in Cambridge soon – we’re only an hour or so by train from Cambridge plus a ten minute walk to the venue, so it should be an easy trip!

How not to predict the future of search

I’ve just seen an article titled Enterprise Search: 14 Industry Experts Predict the Future of Search which presents a list of somewhat contradictory opinions. I’m afraid I have some serious issues with the experts chosen and the undeniably blinkered views some of them have presented.

Firstly, if you’re going to ask a set of experts to write about Enterprise Search, don’t choose an expert in SEO as part of your list. SEO is not Enterprise Search, in fact a lot of the time it isn’t anything at all (except snake oil) – it’s a way of attempting to game the algorithms of web search engines. Secondly, at least make some attempt to prevent your experts from just listing the capabilities of their own companies in their answers: in fact one ‘expert’ was actually a set of PR-friendly answers from a company rather than a person, including listing articles about their own software. The expert from Microsoft rather predictably failed to notice the impact of open source on the search market, before going on to put a positive spin on the raft of acquisitions of search companies over the last few years (and it’s certainly not all good, as a recent writedown has proved). Apparently the acquisition of specialist search companies by corporate behemoths will drive innovation – that is, unless that specialist knowledge vanishes into the behemoth’s Big Data strategy, never to be seen again. Woe betide the past customers that have to get used to a brand new pricing, availability and support plan as well.

Luckily it wasn’t all bad – there were some sensible viewpoints on the need for better interaction with the user, the rise of semantic analysis and how the rise of open source is driving out inefficiency in the market – but the article is absolutely peppered with buzzwords (Big Data being the most prevalent, of course) and contains some odd cliches: “I think a generation of people believes the computer should respond like HAL 9000″…didn’t HAL 9000 kill most of the crew and attempt to lock the survivor outside the airlock?

I’m pretty sure this isn’t a feature we want to replicate in an Enterprise Search system.

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Posted in News

May 15th, 2014

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Cambridge Search Meetup – Cassandra & Solr

A sunny evening last night for the latest Cambridge Search Meetup, which featured a couple of talks from Datastax on the highly scalable NoSQL database Apache Cassandra and how it is integrated with Apache Lucene/Solr. Jeremy Hanna started us off with a brief history of the Facebook-incubated Cassandra, which is a fully distributed, highly reliable system used by many including Netflix and Spotify with some customers running thousands of nodes in multiple data centres. Cassandra has its own SQL-like language, CQL3 and some basic collections such as Lists and Maps, but due to its fully distributed nature does lack some traditional features such as JOINs. Datastax themselves are now responsible for most of the ongoing work on Cassandra and offer the usual array of training, support, management services and tools. One common application mentioned was high speed and reliable recording of sensor data, increasingly important now with the rise of the Internet of Things.

After a short break for drinks and snacks (which this time were kindly sponsored by Datastax) Sergio Bossa told us how Solr is integrated with Cassandra, also running in a distributed fashion. Interestingly, this integration doesn’t use the same Zookeeper system as SolrCloud (the standard way to run clusters of Solr servers) but relies instead on Cassandra’s own internal scaling systems, passing data about using ‘gossip‘ between nodes. Zookeeper is not always the easiest thing to get running so an alternative is very interesting! Data can be added to the system over HTTP or the aforementioned CQL3 and after being entered into Cassandra’s tables is subsequently indexed by Solr. Queries can then be made over HTTP as usual. Some work is still necessary to prevent duplication of effort (at present one needs to create data structures in Cassandra and subsequently in Solr).

It was pleasing so see that so much care has been taken with this integration process and also that Datastax offer their Datastax Enterprise Search stack not only free for non-production use, but free to startups. Thanks to Jeremy, Sergio and all who came along and we’ll be back with another Search Meetup soon.

As Hadoop gains, does Lucene benefit?

The last few weeks have seen a rush of investment in companies that offer Hadoop-powered Big Data platforms – the most recent being Intel’s investment in Cloudera, but Hortonworks has also snorted up $100m.

Gartner correctly explains that Hadoop isn’t just one project, but an ecosystem comprising an increasing number of open source projects (and some closed source distributions and add-ons). Once you’ve got your Big Data in a HDFS-shaped pile, there are many ways to make sense of it – and one of those is a search engine, so there’s been a lot of work recently trying to add Lucene-powered search engines such as Apache Solr and Elasticsearch into the mix. There’s also been some interesting partnerships.

I’m thus wondering whether this could signal a significant boost to the development of these search projects: there are already Lucene/Solr committers working at Hadoop-flavoured companies who have been working on distributed search and other improvements to scalability. Let’s hope some of the investment cash goes to search!

Convergence and collisions in Enterprise Search

At the end of next month I’ll be at Enterprise Search Europe (I’m on the programme committee and help with the open source track) and the opening keynote this year is from Dale Roberts, author of the book Decision Sourcing. Dale will be talking about how Social, Big Data, Analytics and Enterprise Search are on a collision course and business leaders ignore these four themes at their peril.

So I wondered if we could see how in practical terms one might build systems based on these four themes. There are technical and logistical challenges of course (not least convincing someone to pay for the effort) but it’s worth exploring nonetheless.

Social in a business context can mean many things: social media is inherently noisy (and as far as I can see mostly cats) but when social tools are used within a business they can be a great way to encourage collaboration. We ourselves have added social features to search applications – user tagging of search results for example, to improve relevance for future searches and to help with de-duplication. Much has been made of the idea of finding not just relevant documents, but the subject matter experts that may have written them, or just other people in your organisation who are interested in the same subject. From a technical point of view none of this is particularly hard – you just have to add these social signals to your index and surface them in some intuitive way – but getting a high enough percentage of users to contribute to shared discussions and participate in tagging can be difficult.

Big Data is an overused term – but in a business context people usually apply it to very large collections of log files or other data showing how your customers are interacting with your business. A lot of search engine experts will tell you that Big Data isn’t always that ‘big’ – we’ve been dealing with collections of hundreds of millions or even billions of indexed items for many years now, the trick is scaling your solution appropriately (not just in technical terms, but in an economic way, as linearly as possible). If you’ve got a few million items, I’m sorry but you haven’t got Big Data, you’ve just got some data.

I’ve always been unsure of the benefits of search Analytics but I’m beginning to change my mind, having seen a some very impressive demos recently. Search engines have always counted things; the clever bit is allowing for queries that can surface unusual or interesting information, and using modern visualisation techniques to show this. Knowing the most popular search term may not be as important as spotting an unexpected one.

So we’ve indexed our data including tags, personnel records, internal chatrooms; put them all onto a elastically scalable platform and built some intuitive and useful interfaces to search and analyze our data. I’m pretty sure you could do all this with the open source technologies we have today (including Scrapy, Apache Lucene/Solr, Elasticsearch, Apache Hadoop, Redis, Logstash, Kibana, JQuery, Dropwizard, Python and Java). This isn’t the whole story though: you’d need a cross-disciplinary team within your organisation with the ability to gather user requirements and drive adoption, a suitable budget for prototyping, development and ongoing support and refinements to the system and a vision encompassing the benefits that it would bring your business. Not an inconsiderable challenge!

What questions should we be able to ask the system? I’ll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

See you in April! If you’d like a 20% discount on registration use the code HULL20. We’ll also be running an evening Meetup on Tuesday 29th April open to both conference attendees and others.

Time for the crystal ball again…

It’s always fun to make predictions about the future, especially as one can be pretty sure to be proved wrong in interesting ways. At the start of 2014 we at Flax are looking forward to another year of building open source search and we already have some great client projects in progress that we’ll shortly be able to talk about, but what else might be happening this year? Here’s some points to note:

  • The Elasticsearch project continues to add features at a prodigious rate during the arms race between it and Apache Solr – this battle can only be good news for end users in our view. We can expect a 1.0 release of Elasticsearch this year and several further major 4.x releases of Solr.
  • The Solr world has become slightly more complex as original author Yonik Seeley has left Lucidworks to start his own company, Heliosearch – with its own packaged distribution of Solr. How will Heliosearch contribute to the Solr ecosystem?
  • HP Autonomy is a sponsor of the Enterprise Search Europe conference this year, although there’s still some fallout from HP’s acquisition of Autonomy, and little news from the various official investigations into this process. Perhaps this year HP’s overall strategy will become a little clearer.
  • The Big Data bandwagon rolls on and more or less every search company now stresses its capabilities in this area for marketing purposes: but how big is Big? It’s not enough just to re-quote IDC’s latest study on how many exobytes everyone is producing these days, the value is in the detail, not the sheer volume: good (and deep) analytics is the key.
  • We think there might be some interesting things happening around open source search and bioinformatics soon – watch this space!

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Posted in News

January 7th, 2014

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