Searching for opportunities in Real-Time Analytics

I spent a day last week at a new event from UNICOM, a conference on Real-Time Analytics. Mike Ferguson chaired the event and was kind enough to spend time with me over lunch exploring how search software might fit into the mix, something that has been on my mind since hearing about the Unified Log concept a few weeks ago.

Real-Time Analytics is a field where sometimes vast amounts of data in motion is gathered, filtered, cleaned and analysed to trigger various actions to benefit a business: building on earlier capabilities in Business Intelligence, the endgame is a business that adapts automatically to changing conditions in real-time – for example, automating the purchasing of extra stock based on changing behaviour of customers. The analysis part of this chain is driven by complex models, often based on sets of training data. Complex Event Processing or CEP is an older term for this kind of process (if you’re already suffering from buzzword overflow, Martin Kleppman has put some of these terms in context for those more familiar with web paradigms). Tools mentioned included Amazon Kinesis and from the Apache stable Cassandra, Hadoop, Kafka, Yarn, Storm and Spark. I particularly enjoyed Michael Cutler‘s presentation on Tumra’s Spark-based system.

One of the central problems identified was due to the rapid growth of data (including from the fabled Internet of Things) it will shortly be impossible to store every data point produced – so we must somehow sort the wheat from the chaff. Options for the analysis part include SQL-like query languages and more complex machine learning algorithms. I found myself wondering if search technology, using a set of stored queries, could be used somehow to reduce the flow of this continuous stream of data, using something like this prototype implementation based on Apache Samza. One could use this approach to transform unstructured data (say, a stream of text-based customer comments) into more structured data for later timeline analysis, split streams of events into several parts for separate processing or just to watch for sets of particularly interesting and complex events. Although search platforms such as Elasticsearch are already being integrated into the various Real-Time Analytics frameworks, these seem to be being used for offline processing rather than acting directly on the stream itself.

One potential advantage is that it might be a lot easier for analysts to generate a stored search than to learn SQL or the complexities of machine learning – just spend some time with a collection of past events and refine your search terms, facets and filters until your results are useful, and save the query you have generated.

This was a very interesting introduction to a relatively new field and thanks to UNICOM for the invitation. We’re going to continue to explore the possibilities!

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