Searching & monitoring the Unified Log

This week I dropped into the Unified Log Meetup held at the rather hard to find offices of Just Eat (luckily there was some pizza left). The Unified Log movement is interesting and there’s a forthcoming book on the subject from Snowplow’s Alex Dean – the short version is this is all about massive scale logging of everything a business does in a resilient fashion and the eventual insights one might gain from this data. We’re considering streams of data rather than silos or repositories we usually index here, and I was interested to see how search technology might fit into the mix.

The first talk by Ian Meyers from AWS was about Amazon Kinesis, a hosted platform for durable storage of stream data. Kinesis focuses on durability and massive volume – 1 MB/sec was mentioned as a common input rate, and data is stored across multiple availability zones. The price of this durability is latency (from a HTTP PUT to the associated GET might be as much as three seconds) but you can be pretty sure that your data isn’t going anywhere unexpectedly. Kinesis also allows processing on the data stream and output to more permanent storage such as Amazon S3, or Elasticsearch for indexing. The analytics options allow for counting, bucketing and some filtering using regular expressions, for real-time stream analysis and dashboarding, but nothing particularly advanced from a search point of view.

Next up was Martin Kleppman (taking a sabbatical from LinkedIn and also Apache Kafka and Apache Samza. Martin’s slides described how LinkedIn handles 7-8 million messages a second using Kafka, which can be thought of an append-only file – to get data out again, you simply start reading from a particular place in the file, with all the reliable storage done for you under the hood. It’s a much simpler system than RabbitMQ which we’ve used on client projects at Flax in the past.

Martin explored how Samza can be used as a stream processing layer on top of Kafka, and even how oft-used databases can be moved into local storage within a Samza process. Interestingly, he described how a database can be expressed simply as a change log, with Kafka’s clever log compaction algorithms making this an efficient way to represent it. He then moved on to describe a prototype integration with our Luwak stored query library, allowing for full-text search within a stream, with the stored queries and matches themselves being of course just more Kafka streams.

It’s going to be interesting to see how this concept develops: the Unified Log movement and stream processing world in general seems to lack this kind of advanced text matching capability, and we’ve already developed Luwak as a highly scalable solution for some of our clients who may need to apply a million stored queries to a million new stories a day. The volumes discussed at the Meetup are a magnitude beyond that of course but we’re pretty confident Luwak and Samza can scale. Watch this space!

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