More than an API – the real third wave of search technology

I recently read a blog post by Karl Hampson of Realise Okana (who offer HP Autonomy and SRCH2 as closed source search options) on his view of the ‘third wave’ of search. The second wave he identifies (correctly) as open source, admitting somewhat grudgingly that “We’d heard about Lucene for years but no customers seemed to take it seriously until all of a sudden they did”. However, he also suggests that there is a third wave on its way – and this is led by HP with its IDOL OnDemand offering.

I’m afraid to say I think that IDOL OnDemand is in fact neither innovative or market leading – it’s simply an API to a cloud hosted search engine and some associated services. Amazon Cloudsearch (originally backed by Amazon’s own A9 search engine, but more recently based on Apache Solr) offers a very similar thing, as do many other companies including and Qbox with an Elasticsearch backend. For those with relatively simple search requirements and no issues with hosting their data with a third party, these services can be great value. It is however interesting to see the transition of Autonomy’s offering from a hugely expensive license fee (plus support) model to an on-demand cloud service: the HP acquisition and the subsequent legal troubles have certainly shaken things up! At a recent conference I heard a HP representative even suggest that IDOL OnDemand is ‘free software’ which sounds like a slightly desperate attempt to jump on the open source bandwagon and attract some hacker interest without actually giving anything away.

So if a third wave of search technology does exist, what might it actually be? One might suggest that companies such as Attivio or our partners Lucidworks, with their integrated solutions built on proven and scalable open source cores and folding in Hadoop and other Big Data stacks, are surfing pretty high at present. Others such as Elasticsearch (the company) are offering advanced analytical capabilities and easy scalability. We hear about indexes of billions of items, thousands of separate indexes : the scale of some of these systems is incredible and only economically possible where license fees aren’t a factor. Across our own clients we’re seeing searches across huge collections of complex biological data and monitoring systems handling a million new stories a day. Perhaps the third wave of search hasn’t yet arrived – we’re just seeing the second wave continue to flood in.

One interesting potential third wave is the use of search technology to handle even higher volumes of data (which we’re going to receive from the Internet of Things apparently) – classifying, categorising and tagging streams of machine-generated data. Companies such as Twitter and LinkedIn are already moving towards these new models – Unified Log Processing is a commonly used term. Take a look at a recent experiment in connecting our own Luwak stored query library to Apache Samza, developed at LinkedIn for stream processing applications.

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  1. Pingback: Two Search Conferences in Two Weeks Was Too Informative | OpenSource Connections | Solr, Big Data, and NoSQL consultants

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