Elasticsearch meetup – Duedil, Hadoop and more

I visited the London Elasticsearch User Groupsmeetup last night for the first time, in the rather splendid HQ of Skills Matter just down from Old Street – the venue had a great buzz. The first speaker was Chris Simpson from Duedil who provide UK company information gleaned from Companies House and other sources. He told us about using Elasticsearch to provide faceted search (including some great clickable bar graphs for numerical range facets) and how they bulk index around 9 million company records in about an hour, using Elasticsearch’s alias features to swap in new indexes once they’re ready – so there is no impact on search performance while indexing. He mentioned a common problem with search engines, which is there is no easy way to be sure how much hardware you’ll need until you ‘know your data and know your hosts’.

Next up was Chris Harris from Hortonworks, who provide a packaged and supported Apache Hadoop distribution. He explained how Hadoop can be used for capturing huge numbers of transactions (these could be interactions with an e-commerce website for example) and for storing them in a distributed database on low-cost hardware. The Hive ‘SQL-like’ language can then be used to extract the data and send it directly to Elasticsearch, or indeed to run queries on Elasticsearch and send the results back to Hadoop as a table. Similar processes can be run with the Pig scripting language. There followed some interesting discussions about the future of Hadoop, where search engines such as Elasticsearch may run directly on Hadoop nodes, working with the data locally. It will be interesting to compare this with the approach taken by Cloudera who are talking on Hadoop & Solr this Thursday at our own Meetup in Cambridge.

Clinton Gormley from Elasticsearch finished up with a Q&A, during which he talked about the new Phrase Suggesters based on Lucene’s new Finite State Machines, and gave hints about when the long awaited 1.0 release of Elasticsearch will appear – apparently early 2014 is now likely.

Thanks to all the speakers and to Elasticsearch for the very welcome beer and pizza – this certainly won’t be our last visit to this user group on what is an increasingly adopted open source search engine.

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